Thursday, February 01, 2018

Giuristi inglesi online: 1. James Kent (1763-1847): Commentaries on American Law.

B. Home. L. → 1.2
I vol. 1ª ed. 1826.
COMMENTARIES
on
American Law

by James Kent

Vol. I
 Prima Edizione

New York
published by O. Halsted
1826
 

Fonte edizioni online: Internet Archive.
Elenco sommario delle edizioni disponibili online del Primo Volume: 1ª ed. 1826: Preface. - Contents. – 2ª ed. 1832: To William Johnson. - Advertisement to the second edition. -


James Kent (1763-1847)
Having retired from public office in the summer of 1823, I had the honour to receive the appointment of Professor of law in Columbia College. The trustees of that institution have repeatedly given me the most liberal and encouraging proofs of their respect and confidence, and of which I shall ever retaining gratefull recollection. A similar appointment was received from them in the year 1793; and this renewed mark of their approbation determined me to employ the entire leisure in which I found myself, in further endeavours to discarge the debt wich, according to Bord Bacon, every man owes to his profession. I was strongly induced to accept the trust from the want of occupation: being apprensive that the sudden cessation of my habitual employement (a), and the contrast between the discussion of the forum, and the solitude of retirement, might be unpropotious to my health and spirits, and cast a premature shade over the happiness of declining years.

a. I was appointed Recorder of New-York in March, 1797, and from that time until August, 1823, was constantly employed in judicial duties.

The following Lectures are the fruit of the acceptance of that trust; and in the performance of my collegiate duty, I had the satisfaction to meet a collection of interesting young gentlemen of fine talents and pure character, who placed themselves under my instruction, and in whose future welfare a deep interest is felt.

Having been encouraged to suppose that the publication of the Lectures might render them more extensively useful, I have been induced to submit the present volume to the notice of students, and of the junior members of the profession, for whose use they were originally compiled. Another volume ist wantig to embrace all the material parts of the Lectures wich have been composed. It will treat at large, and in an elementary manner, of the law of property, and of personal right, and commercial contracts; and will be prepared for the press in the course of the ensuing year, unless, in the mean time, there should be reason to apprehended, that another volume would be trespassing too far upon the patience and indulgence of the public.

New York, November 23, 1826. 

CONTENTS
Part I.
Of the Law of Nations.

Lecture II.  Of the Right and Duties of Nations in a State of Peace.
Lecture III.  Of the Declaration, and other early measures of a state of War.
Lecture IV.  Of the various kinds do Property liable to Capture.
Lecture V.  Of the Right of Belligerent Nations in relation to each other.
Lecture VI.  Of the general Rights and Duties of Neutral Nations.
Lecture VII.  Of Restriction upon Neutral Trade.
Lecture VIII.  truces, Passports and Treaties of Peace.
Lecture IX.  Of Offences against the Law of Nations.

Part II.
Of the Gouvernment and constitutional  Jurisprudence of the United States.

Lecture X.  Of the History of American Union.
Lecture XI.  Of Congress.
Lecture XII.  Of Judicial Costruction of the Powers of Congress.
Lecture XIII.  Of the President.
Lecture XIV.  Of the Judiciary Department.
Lecture XV.  Of the Original and Appellate Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court.
Lecture XVI. Of the Jurisdiction of the Federal Courts in respect to the Common Law, and in respect to Parties.
Lecture XVII. On the district and territorial Courts of the United States.
Lecture XVIII. On the Concurrent Jurisdiction of the State Gouvernements.
Lecture XIX. Of Constitutional Restrictions on the Powers of several States.

Part. III.
Of the various Sources of the municipal Law of the several States.

Lecture XX. Of Statute Law.
Lecture XXI. Of Reports of Judicial Decisions.
Lecture XXII. Of the Principal Publications on the Common Law.
Lecture XXIII. Of the Civil Law.


To William Jones  - Advertisement to the second edition - Contents
William Johnson, Esq.

Dear Sir,

William Johnson (1771-1834)
In compiling these volume, (original intended, and now published, for the benefit of American students,), I have frequently been led to revisit the same ground, and to follow out the same paths, over which I have so often passed with you as a companion to cheer and delight me.

You have reported every opinion I gave in term time, and thought worth reporting, during the five and twenty years that I was a Judge at Law and in Equity, with the exception of the short interval occupied by Mr. Caines’ Report. I had the happiness to maintain a free, cordial, and instructive intercourse with you; and I feel unwilling now to close my labours as an author, and withdraw myself finally from the public eye, without leaving some memorial of my grateful sense of the value of your friendship, and my reverence for your charachter.

In inscribing this work to you, I beg leave, sir, at the same time, to add my ardent wishes for your future welfare, and to assure you of my constant esteem and regard.

James Kent

to the second edition

2ª ed. 1832.
In preparing a new edition of these Commentaries for the presse, I have non been inattentive to the many alternations wich have taken place in our american law, since the first volume appeared in 1826. Within that period, the laws of the government of the United States have undergone some important amendments, and the constitution itself has received additional explanations by the courts of justice. So, also, the statutes and judicial decisions in the several states, have introduced essential changes in the local jurisprudence of the country. This has been particularly the case in New-York, by means of the Revised Statutes, which were published, and went into operation, since the date of the third of these volumes. Their influence on the law concerning real property I had an opportunity to consider in the fourth volume; but they have also made material alterations on other subjects, which I had already discussed; and especially in relation to the writ of habeas corpus – marriage and divorce – absconding debtors – insolvent laws – the administration of the estates of deceased persons – the powers of surrogates – the power of factors – the question of fraud in sales – damages on protested bills, and the law of distress. To have suffered a new edition of the Commentaries to appear under my own supervision, without noticing the changes and improvements in the law which had been made since their first publication, would have impaired the credit of the work. I have accordling availed myself of these alterations, and of all the means of information within my power, by a perusal of the latest Reports and Treatises, from abroad, and from every part of the United States. It has been my object to ascertain and state truly and accurately the law of the land, in the extent to which I profess to examine it, as it existed at the commencement of the present year.

I take this occasion to return my grateful acknowledgments to the American bar, to many distinguished judicial and literary charachters, and to the public at large, for the kind notice and liberal patronage with which these volumes have been honoured; and I have endeavoured, in the present edition, to lessen their imperfections, and to increase their accuracy, by a diligent adn careful revisal of every part of them, and by making such corrections and improvements as have been suggested to me by others, or dictated by my own reading and reflections. In some instances the work has been enlarged by the addition of distinct heads of discussion, such as the lex loci as to contracts – the interpretation of contract, and the law of insurance of lives, and against fire. The general Index, at the end of the fourth volume, has also been much enlarged; and as the first volume, or the most material part of it, is academically taught in some of our public institutions, I have added a separate Index to that volume, and marginal references of the same nature, to facilitate the study of it; and that volume will continue to be separetely sold. My thanks are due to one of the military officers of the academy at West-Point, for the obliging offer of his own private, but minute and judicious Index to the first part of that volume, and for the assistance which it has afforded me; and I am also indebted to the President of Geneva College, for some important suggestions which have been adopted.

It has been a practice with many law writers, to alter and enlarge their works in subsequent editions, so as to meet the variations and different aspects constantly taking place in the science of law, by reason of legislative enactments, and a course of judicial decisions. They have also endeavoured to improve them by such illustrations as new cases, and the further investigation and final settlement of principles, afforded. This has been the case, in a striking manner, with Mr. Bell’s Commentaries on the Laws of Scotland ; the Law of Marine Insurance, by Mr. Justice Parke; the Essay on Contingent Remainders, by Mr. Fearne; and the Treatise of Powers, by Sir Edward B. Sugden. The manner in which these volumes were originally compiled, and successively published; and the character, variety, and immense details, of the jurisprudence of the several states, and the difficulty of understanding, and stating precisely, their conflicting provisions, would seem to render a free imitation of such high examples the more pardonable, if not the more essential. But I do not purpose to interfere hereafter with the work as it is now presented to the public, even if I should live to see other editions. The volumes are intended to remain as evidence of my view of the law as it now exists; and I shall leave to others the task of following it in its future vicissitudes, if such vicissitudes are to be its destiny. I am not, however, without a humble hope, that the spirit of innovation may hereafter be somewhat abated, and a character for greater stability gradually impressed upon our American jurisprudence.

New-York, April 23d, 1832.

CONTENTS

PART I.
Of The Law of Nations.

Lecture I. Of the Foundation and History of the Law of Nations.
1. Moral obligation of States.
2. Law of Nation in ancient Greece.
3. Law of Nation in acient Rome.
4. Law of Nation in the middle age.
5. Influence of Christianity.
6. Of Chivalry.
7. Of the Civil Law.
8. Of Treaties.
9. Law concerning shipwrecks.
10. Treatment of prisoners.
11. Admission of Ambassadors.
12. Grotius.
13. Pufendorf.
14. Martens.
15. Bynkershoeck’s.
16. Vattel.
17. Modern improvements in the law of Nations.
18. Importance of the study.
Lecture II. Of the Rights and Duties of Nations in a State of Peace.
1. Right of interference with other states.
2. Jurisdiction over adjoining seas.
3. Rights of commerce.
4. Right of passage over land.
5. Right of navigable rivers.
6. Surrender of fugitives.
7. Ambassadors.
8. Consuls.
Lecture III. Of the Declaration and Early Measures of War.
1. Assistance to allies in war.
2. Declaration of war.
3. Protection to enemy’s property.
4. Confiscation of preperty.
5. Confiscation of debts.
6. Interdiction of commerce.
Lecture IV. Of the various kinds of property liable to capture.
1. Domicil in the enemy’s country.
2. residence in it.
3. Colonian trado.
4. Property in transitu.
Lecture V. Of the Right of Belligerents.
1. Moderation, a duty.
2. Law of retaliation.
3. Privateering.
4. Prizes.
5. Ransom bills. 
6. Right of Postliminium.
Lecture VI. Of the Right and Duties of Neutrals.
1. Neutral territory inviolable.
2. Enemy’s property in neutral vessels.
3. Neutral property in an enemy’s vessel.
Lecture VII. Of Restrictions upon Neutral Trade.
1. Contraband of war.
2. Blockades.
3. Right of search.
Lecture VIII. Of Truces, Passports, and Treaties of Peace.
1. Of truces.
2. Passports.
3. Treaties of peace.
Lecture IX. Of Offences against the Law of Nations.
1. Violation of passports.
2. Violacion of ambassadors.
3. Piracy.
4. Slave Trade.

Part II.
Of the Government and constitutional jurisprudence of the United States.

Lecture X. Of the History of the American Union.
Lecture XI. Of Congress.
Lecture XII.  Of Judicial Construction of the Power of Congress.
1. Of priority of payment claimed by U.S.
2. Power to incorporate a bank.
3. Taxation.
4. Pre-emption of Indian lands.
5. Effect of state judgment.
6. Power of Congress over the militis.
7. Power of Congress as to internal improvements.
Lectures XIII. Of the president.
1. Unity of the office.
2. Qualifications.
3. Mode of election.
4. Duration of office.
5. Support,
6. powers.
7. His responsability.
Lecture XIV. Of the Judiciary Department.
1. Of the appointment, tenure, and support of the judges,
2. Its general powers.
3. Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court.
4. Jurisdiction of the Circuit Courts.
5. Jurisdiction of the District Courts.
6. Jurisdiction of the auxiliary State Courts.
7. Of attorneys and counsel.
8. Clerks.
9. Marshals.
Lecture XV. Of the Original and Appellate Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court.
1. Its original jurisdiction.
2. Its appelate jurisdiction in cases pending in State Courts.
3. Its powers in cases of mandamus.
4. Its original jurisdiction where a state is a party.
5. Its original jurisdiction regulated by Congress.
6. Its appellate jurisdiction confined to cases under the constitution, treaties, and laws.
7. Its appellate jurisdiction to matter appearing on record.
8. Its appellate jurisdiction exists, though a state be a party.
Lecture XVI. Of the Jurisdiction of the Federal Courts, in respect to the Common Law, and in respect to Parties.
1. Common law jurisdiction in criminal cases.
2. Common law in civil cases.
3. Jurisdiction when an alien is a party.
4. Jurisdiction between citizens of different states.
5. jurisdiction when a state is interested.
Lecture XVII. Of the District Courts of the United States.
1. Of the District Courts as prize courts.
2. Admiralty criminal jurisdiction.
3. Limits of admiralty jurisdiction.
4. Jurisdiction of the Instance Courts.
5. Civil jurisdiction of the District Courts.
6. Territorial Courts of the United States.
Lecture XVIII. Of the Concurrent Jurisdiction of the State Gouvernments.
1. Of concurrent powers of legislation.
2. Of concurrent judicial power.
Lecture XIX. Of Constitutional Restrictions on the Powers of the States.
1. Oh hills of credit.
2. Ex post facto laws.
3. The states cannot control the exercise of federal power.
4. Nor impair the obligation of contracts.
5. Nor pass naturalization laws.
6. Nor tax national banks or stock.
7. Nor exercise power over ceded places.
8. Power to regulate commerce.
9. Progress of the national jurisprudence.

Part III.
Of the various sources of the municipal law of the United States.

Lecture XX. Of Statute Law.
1. Laws repugnant to the constitution void.
2. Power of the judiciary to declare theim void.
3. When a statute takes effect.
4. Acts public and private.
5. Rules for the interpretation of statutes.
6. Effect of temporary statutes.
7. Statute penalties.
Lecture XXI. Of Reports of Judicial Decisions.
1. Source of the common law.
2. Force of adjudged cases.
3. Notice of the principal report at law.
4. Notice of the principal report at law an in equity.
5. Interesting character of reports.
Lecture XXII. Of the Principal Publications on the Common Law.
Lecture XXIII. Of the Civil Law.
1. Early Roman law.
2. The twelve tables.
3. The Pretorian law.
4. Responsa prudentum.
5. Imperial Rescripts.
6. Justinian’s Code.
- Institutes.
- Pandectes.
-  Novels.
7. Loss of the civil law.
8. Its revivals.


4ª ed. 1840

To William Jones  - Advertisement to the second edition - Contents
William Johnson, Esq.

Dear Sir,

William Johnson (1771-1834)
In compiling these volume, (original intended, and now published, for the benefit of American students,), I have frequently been led to revisit the same ground, and to follow out the same paths, over which I have so often passed with you as a companion to cheer and delight me.

You have reported every opinion I gave in term time, and thought worth reporting, during the five and twenty years that I was a Judge at Law and in Equity, with the exception of the short interval occupied by Mr. Caines’ Report. I had the happiness to maintain a free, cordial, and instructive intercourse with you; and I feel unwilling now to close my labours as an author, and withdraw myself finally from the public eye, without leaving some memorial of my grateful sense of the value of your friendship, and my reverence for your charachter.

In inscribing this work to you, I beg leave, sir, at the same time, to add my ardent wishes for your future welfare, and to assure you of my constant esteem and regard.

James Kent


Preface.
To the first volume of the first edition.

James Kent (1763-1847)
Having retired from public office in the summer of 1823, I had the honour to receive the appointment of Professor of law in Columbia College. The trustees of that institution have repeatedly given me the most liberal and encouraging proofs of their respect and confidence, and of which I shall ever retaining gratefull recollection. A similar appointment was received from them in the year 1793; and this renewed mark of their approbation determined me to employ the entire leisure in which I found myself, in further endeavours to discarge the debt wich, according to Bord Bacon, every man owes to his profession. I was strongly induced to accept the trust from the want of occupation: being apprensive that the sudden cessation of my habitual employement (a), and the contrast between the discussion of the forum, and the solitude of retirement, might be unpropotious to my health and spirits, and cast a premature shade over the happiness of declining years.

a. I was appointed Recorder of New-York in March, 1797, and from that time until August, 1823, was constantly employed in judicial duties.

The following Lectures are the fruit of the acceptance of that trust; and in the performance of my collegiate duty, I had the satisfaction to meet a collection of interesting young gentlemen of fine talents and pure character, who placed themselves under my instruction, and in whose future welfare a deep interest is felt.

Having been encouraged to suppose that the publication of the Lectures might render them more extensively useful, I have been induced to submit the present volume to the notice of students, and of the junior members of the profession, for whose use they were originally compiled. Another volume ist wantig to embrace all the material parts of the Lectures wich have been composed. It will treat at large, and in an elementary manner, of the law of property, and of personal right, and commercial contracts; and will be prepared for the press in the course of the ensuing year, unless, in the mean time, there should be reason to apprehended, that another volume would be trespassing too far upon the patience and indulgence of the public.

New York, November 23, 1826. 

























Top.

Friday, January 26, 2018

Giuristi tedeschi online: 1. August Wilhelm Heffter (1796-1880): Das europäisches Völkerrecht der Gegenwart auf den bisherigen Grundlagen (8ª ed. 1888, 1ª ed. 1844)

B. Home. ↔ Successivo.
8ª ed. ted., 1888.
Das
Europäische Völkerrecht
der Gegenwart
auf den bisherigen Grundlagen
von
Dr. August Wilhelm Heffter,

Achte Ausgabe
(babele1)

bearbeitet von Dr. F. Heinr. Hesscken Berlin, Verlag von H. W. Müller, 1888. Fonte: Internet Archive.

Vorwort zur Siebenten Ausgabe.

7ª ed. ted., 1882.
Ich bin auf den Antrag des Herrn Verlgegers, eine neue Ausgabe des Hesster’schen Völkerrechtes zu übernehmen, gern eingegangen, weil ich es bedauern würde, wenn bis Werk deshalb in Zukunft weniger gebraucht werden sollte, weil es nach dem Tode seines Versasser allmählich veraltete.

Der große Erfolg des Buches erklärt sich aus seinem Verdienst, in knapper Form und mit juristischer Pruacision ein Bild des wirklich geltenden Völkerrecht zu geben. Heffter verkennt nicht dessen Unvollkommenheiten und Lücken, aber er hutet sich dieselben in der Art auszufüllen, wie Blunschli dies in seinem Rechtsbuch gethan, in welchem das anerkannt gültige Recht vermischt mit dem erscheint, was nach Ansicht des Verfassers Recht sein sollte. Unstreitig hat die Wissenschaft das Recht und die Pflicht die Mängel des geltenden Recht zu beleuchten und auf die Vervollkommnung des Bestehenden hinzuarbeiten, aber dies berechtigt sie nicht nicht dem Augenblick vorzugreifen, wo eine Rechtsanschauung wirklich zum allgemein geltenden Rechtssatz durch den consensus gentium geworden ist. Auf diese Weise geräth man stets in Gefahr das Wünschenswerthe und oft das nur subjectiv Gewünschte mit dem Wirklichen und Möglichen zu verwechseln und giebt dadurch der skeptischen Kritik der Leugner des Völkerrechtes Raum, welche derartige persönliche und oft unausführbare Forderungen zum  Anlaß ihrer Behauptung nehmen, daß es wohl ein internationales Herkommen, aber kein internationales Recht gäbe. Ein solches läßt sich nur mit Erfolg behaupten, wenn man sich  streng an das hält, was wirklich allgemein als gültiges Recht anerkannt ist und hiervon die wünschenswerthen Reformen genau trennt, dies aber ist eben die gesunde Grundlage, auf der daß Heffter’sche Völkerrecht beruht und die es zu einem zuverlässigen Führer macht. Da meine Aufgabe nur war eine neue Ausgabe desselben zu liefern, so habe ich mich nicht berechtigt gehalten, und den Text des Werkes zu ändern. wie dies z.B. von Abdy bei der neuen Ausgabe von Kent’s Commentaries und von Sir Sherton Baker bei der von Halleck’s International Law geschehen ist. Selbst wen man die eigenen Einfügungen durch Klammern bezeichnet, ist nicht immer klar zu erkennen, was dem ursprünglichen Verfasser und was dem Bearbeiter gehört, da der Zusammenhang oft Aenderungen des textes erfordet. Man sieht dies auch bei der Bearbeitung der Rau’schen Lehrbücher von Wagner, wo man bei den oft combinirten Initialen R. und W. im Zweifel darüber bleiben muß, wessen Werk man vor sich hat.

7ª ed. 1881.
Ich habe also den Text prinzipiell unverändert gelassen und mich darauf beschränkt die litterarischen Nachweise und Daten bis auf die Gegenwart fortzufuuhren. Die mir nothwendig erscheinenden Ergänzungen dagegen, meine eigenen Ansichten und meine Abweichungen von Heffter habe ich in selbstuandigen, durch ein G. bezeichnet Ausführingen gegeben. Um für die Erweiterung des Werkes Raum zu gewinnen, sind die bisherigen Anlagen, welche einige größere völkerrechtliche Aktenstücke umfaßten, fortgeblieben sind, ebenso der Abschnitt “Die diplomatische Kunst”, die nicht eigentlich zum Völkerrecht.

Straßburg, November 1880.
Hesscken.

 
 Vorwort zur achten Auflage 

6ª ed. 1873.
Dem bei der siebenten Auflage befolgten Grundsatz, genau den Heffter’schen Text von meinen Zusätzen und Anmerkungen zu trennen, bin ich auch bei dieser achten Auflage treu geblieben. Nur wurde es im Fortgang der Zeit notwendig, einzelne nachgerade veraltete oder nicht mehr zutreffende Paragraphen des verfassers zu streichen oder umzuarbeiten, auch diese sind wie meine Noten durch ein G. bezeichnet. Ebenso erschien es mir angezeicht, mit veralteten Zitaten aus Werken, welche Niemand mehr liest, aufzuräumen und damit Platz zu gewinnen für die Ausführungen, welche Ereignisse und wissenschaftliche Werke der neuesten Zeit fordern, ohne doch das Buch zu sehr anschwellen zu lassen. Endlich ist das Register umgearbeitet und erweitert.

Hamburg, 1. Januar 1888.
Hesscken.

Uebersicht des Inhalts.

5ª ed. 1867.
Einleitung.
I. Völkerrecht überhaupt.
§ 2. Grundlage und Sanction des Völkerrechtes.
§ 3. Natur der Völkerrgesetze.
§ 4. Inhalt des Völkerrectes und Verhältnis zur Politik.
§ 5. Natürliche Garantie des Völkerrectes: das Gleichgewicht der Staaten.

II. Das Europäischer Völkerrecht.
§ 6. Geschichtliche Genesis.
§ 7. Gültigekeits-Gebiet des Europäischen Völkerrechtes.
§ 8. Aeussere Erkentnißquellen des Völkerrechtes im Allgemeinen.
§ 9. Im Besonderen: Staatliche Verhandlungen und Verträge.
§ 10. Die Theorie und Literatur des Völkerrechtes.

III. Die Specialrechte der Nationen unter einander.
§ 11. Natur derselben.
§ 12. Besondere Entstehungens der Einzelrechte der Staaten.
§ 13. Besitzstand, als subsidiarischer Regulator der Staatenverhaltnisse.

Erstes Buch.
Das Völkerrecht oder die Grundrechte der Nationen in Freidenzeiten.

4ª ed. 1861.
I. Ueberhaupt. § 14.
II. Im Besonderen.
Erste Abteilung. Die Staaten und ihre Rechte.
§§ 15 - 25. Natur, Bedeutung und Verschidenheit der Staaten.
§ 26. Allgemeine Rechte und Grundverhältnisse der Staaten als solcher unter  einander.
§ 27. Princip der Rechtsgliechheit.
§ 28. Eigenthümliche Rangverhältnisse der Europäischen Staaten.
Die Allgemeinen Staatenrechte im Einzelnen.
I. Recht eines ungestörten eigenen Daseins:
§ 29. a. Territorialrecht.
§ 30. b. Recht der Selbsterhaltung.
§ 31. c. Das Recht eines freien staatlichen Haltens. Droit de souveranité.
II. Recht auf Achtung. § 32.
III. Recht auf gegenseitigen Verkehr.
§ 33. Modalitäten der allgemenen Rechte der Einzelstaaten im gegenseitigen Verhältnis unter einander:
I. § 34. Verhältnisse der Staatsgewalten zu auswärtigen Souveränetätsacten und Rechtsverhältnissen in Kollisionsfällen.
§ 35. Inbesondere bei der Rechtspflege.
§ 36. a. Strafrechtspflege.
§§. 37-39. b. Bürgerliches Recht.
3ª ed. 1855.
II. §§ 40-41. Verhältnis der Staatsgewalten zu auswärtigen geistlichen Mächten, insbesonde zum Römische Stuhle.
III. § 42. Recht der Exterritorialität.
IV. § 43. Staatsdienstbarkeiten.
V. §§ 44-46.  Einmischung- (Interventions-) Recht.
§ 47. Spezialrechte einzelner Staaten unter einander.

Zweite Abteilung. § 48. Die Souveräne, ihre persönliche und Familien-Verhältinisse.
§ 49. Erwerb der Souveränität in Allgemeinen.
§ 50. Erwerbungsarten.
§ 51. Initiirung der Souveränität.
§ 52. Zweifache Personlichkeit des Souveräns.
§§ 53-54. Völkerrechtliche Stellung der Souveräne.
§ 55. Völkerrechtliches Verhältnis der Familie des Souverans.
§ 56. Privatrechtliches Verhältnis der souveränen Familien.
§ 57. Verlust der persönlichen Souveränetät.

2ª ed. 1848.
Dritte Abteilung. Die internationalen Rechtsverhältnisse der Privat-personen.
I. § 58-58a. Der Mensch und seine Rechte im Allgemeinen.
II. § 59. Die Staatsangehörigen.
§ 60. Politische Natur des Unterthan-Verhältnisses in Bezug auf völkerrechtliche Beziehungen.
III. § 61. Rechtsverhaltnisse der Ausländer überhaupt.
§ 62. Rechtsverhältnisse der Fremden in eimem auswärtigen Staatsgebiet.
§§ 63-63a. Asylrecht und Recht der Auslieferungen.

Zweiter Abschnitt.
Recht der Sachen.


§ 64. Arten derselben.
§ 65. Das Staatsgebiet.
§ 66. Grenzen des Staatsgebiets.
§ 67. Bedeutung des Staatsgebietes.
§ 68. Staatspertinenzien und Colonien.
§ 69. Erwerbsarten des Staatseigentumes.
§ 70. Insbesondere: Occupation.
§ 71. Verfügungen über das Staatseigentum.
§ 72. Verlust des Staatseigentum.
§ 73. Eigenthumsunfähige Sachen; insbesondere das Meer.
§ 74. Das Meeres-Eigentum überhaupt.
§ 75. Küstengewässer.
§ 76. Geschlossene Meeresgewässer.
§ 77. Nationale Flußgebiete.
§§ 78-80. Die Schiffe und Rechte des Schifffahrt.


Dritter Abschnitt.
Das Recht der Verbindlichkeiten.

1ª ed. 1844.
Erste Abtheilung. Die internationale Verträge.
§ 81. Völkerrechtliche Verbindlichkeit der Verträge überhaupt.
§ 82. Bereich des internationalen Vertragsrechtes.
Wesentliche Bedingungen internationaler Verträge.
I. § 83. Wine zulassige causa.
II. § 84. Dispositionsfähigkeit der Contrahenten.
III. § 85. Willensfreiheit.
§ 86. Entstehung der Verträge.
§ 87. Substantielle Form.
§ 88. Mitwirkung Dritter bei der Vertragsschlisserung.
§§ 89-91. Aeußere Einrichtung, Modalituaten und Arten der Verträge.
§ 92. Gesellschaftsverträge, im Besonderm Allianzen.
§ 93. Vereinsverträge und Conföderationen.
§ 94. Allgemeine Wirkungen der Verträge.
§ 95. Auslegung und analoge Anwendbarkeit der Verträge.
§ 96. Verstärkung der Vertragsverbindlichkeiten.
§ 97. Garantieverträge.
§ 98. Anfechtung der Verträge und Beseitigung der Einreden.
§ 99. Erlöschung der Vetragsverbindlicheiten.

Zeite Abtheilung. Verbindlichkeiten ohne Vertrag.
A. § 100. Aus erlaubten Thatsachen.
B. §§ 101-108. Aus unerlaubten Handlungen.
§ 104. Allgemein ahndungswürdige Verletzungen des Völkerrechtes.

Zeites Buch.
Das Völkerrecht im Zustande des Unfriedens oder Actionrechte der Staaten.

Erstes Abschnitt.
Von den völkerrechtlichen Streitigkeiten und deren Erledigung überhaupt.

Trad. fr. 1883.
§ 105. Veranlassungen derselben.
§ 106. Mittel zur Beseitigung überhaupt.
§ 107. Gütliche Versuche.
§ 108. Besondere Vereinigungsmittel bei zweifelhaften Bunkten.
§ 109. Kompromiß.
§ 110. Retorsion unbilliger Rechtsgrundsätze und Maßregeln.
§ 111. Anvendung von Gewaltsmitteln; im Besonderen von Repressalien.
§ 112. Embargo und Blockade.

Zweiter Abschnitt.
Der Krieg und sein Recht.

§ 113. Rechtsbegriff des Krieges.
§ 114. Kriegsführende Theile. Ius belli i, subjectiven Sinne.
§§ 115-117. Verbündete Mächte.
Trad. fr. 1873.
§ 118. Das Kriegsfeld.
§ 119. Kriegsrecht im objectiven Sinne. Kriegsmanier. Kriegsraison.
§ 120. Anfang des Krieges.
§ 121. Maßregeln vor oder bei Anfang des Krieges.
§ 122. Unmittelbare rechtliche Wirkungen der Kriegseröffnung.
§ 123. Einfluß des Krieges auf den Handelsverkehr feindlicher Personen.
§ 124. Persönlicher Kriegsstand und dessen Aktiv- und Passiv-Objekte im Allgemeinen.
§ 124a. Freibeuter. Freischützen. Freicorps und Corsaren.
§ 125. Erlaubte Mittel der Kriegsführung.
§ 126. Behandlung feindlicher Personen.
§§ 127-129. Kriegsgefangenschaft.
§§ 130-131. Recht auf einzelne feindliche Sachen überhaupt.
§ 132. Wirkliche staatenpraxis.
§ 133. Recht auf undewegliche Sachen im eigenen Lande des Feindes.
§ 134. Unkörperliche sachen in Feindesland.
§§ 135-136. Beuterecht an beweglichen körperlichen Sachen.
§§ 137-139. Appropriation im Seekriege,
§ 140. Rechte der Kriegsführenden auf feindliche Sachen in eigenen Territorium.
§§ 141-143. Verträge während und auf den Fall des Krieges.

Dritter Abschnitt.
Die Neutralen und ihre Rechte.

Trad. fr. 1857.
I. § 144. Ueberhaupt.
§ 145. Grund und Ende der Neutralität.
§ 146. Bedingungen und Pflichten der Neutralität.
II. § 147. Im Einzelnen.
§ 148. Ausdehnung auf die Unterthanen.
§§ 149-150. Rechte der Neutralen.
§ 151. Rechte der Neutralen in Ansehung des Handelns.
§ 152. Entwicklung der Praxis.
§ 153. Darlegung der einzelnen Fragen.
§§ 154-156. Blockaderecht.
§ 157. Uebermäßige Ausdehnung des Blockaderechtes.
§ 158. Unerlaubte Zufuhr von Kriegsbedürfnissen, inbesondere sog. Kriegs-Kontrebande.
§ 159. Juristische Idee der Kriegs.Contrebande.
§ 160. Gegestände der Kriegs-Contrebande.
§ 161. Thatbestand und Folgen der Contrebande.
§ 161a. Analoge Fälle der Kriegs-Contrebande.
§§ 162-164. Beschränkungen des neutralen Frachtverkehres.
§§ 165-166. Zweifelhafte und erlaubte Fälle eines neutralen Handelsverkehres.
§§ 167-169. Heimsuchungs- und Untersuchungsrecht. Ius visitationis. Droit de visite. Right of visit and search.
§ 170. Schutzmittel gegen die Untersuchung durch Convohirung.
§ 171. Recht der Beschlagnahme und Wegführung.
§§ 172-173. Brisengerichtsbarkeit gegen Neutrale.
§ 174. Außenordentliche Maßregeln der Kriegsführenden zum Rachtheile der Neutralen und deren Rechte hiergegen.
§ 175. Rückblick aif die Rechte der Neutralen.

Vierter Abschnitt.
Die Beendigung des Krieges; die Usurpation und das Postliminium.

Carlos Calvo, I-II.
I. § 176. Ende des Krieges.
§ 177. a. Allseitige Aufhebund der Feindlichkeit.
§ 178. b. Völlige Unterwerfung des feindlichen Staates.
§§ 179-181. c. Friedensschlüsse.
§ 182. Besondere Friedensclauseln.
§ 183. Ansatzpunkt der Wirsamkeit.
§ 184. Vollziehung und Aufhebung der Friedensschlüsse.
§ 184a. Wirkung der Friedensschlüsse in Ansehung Dritter.
II. §§ 185-186. Die Zwischenherrschaft und Usurpation.
III. § 187. Das Postliminium.
§ 188. Postliminium der Völker und Staatsgewalten.
§ 189. Postliminium der Privatpersonen und Privatverhältnisse.
§ 190. Postliminium bei einzelnen Rechtsverhältnissen.
§§ 191-192. Recht der Wiedernahme bei Schiffen.

Drittes Buch.
Die Formen des völkerrechtlichen Verkehres 
oder die Staatenpraxis in auswärtigen Augelegenheiten sowohl im Kriege wie im Frieden.

Pradier-Fodéré.
§ 193. Einleitung.

Erster Abschnitt.
Allgemeine Ceremonialrechte im persönlichen Verkehre der Nationen
 und ihrer Souveräne.

§ 194. Ueberhaupt.
§ 195. Recht auf einen bestimmten Ehrenplatz.
§ 196. Coutoisie.
§ 197. See-Ceremonial.

Zeiter Abschnitt.
Der diplomatische Verkehr der Staaten.

§ 198. Einleitung.
Commentaries, Kent I.
Erste Abtheilung. Die Organe des diplomatischen Verkehres.
§ 199. Geschichte und natürliches Princip.
§ 200. Actives und passives Recht zu diplomatischen Missionen.
§ 201. Kategoriem der diplomatischen Organe.
§ 202. Rechtsverhältnisse der diplomatischen Personen überhaupt.
§ 203. Die Rechte fremder Abgeordneten im Allgemeinen.
§ 204. Unverletzbarkeit.
§ 205. ...mtion von fremder Staatsgewalt.
§ 206. Rechte desselben gegen sie.
§ 207. Verhältniß zu dritten Staaten.
I. § 208. Arten und Rechtsverhältnisse der charakterisierten Gesandten.
§ 209. Modalitäten der Ernennungen.
§ 210. Beglaubigung und Sicherstellung des gesandtschaftlichen Charakters.
§§ 211-200. Sonstige gesandschaftliche Rechte.
§ 221. Familie und Gefolge der Gesandten.
II. § 222. Agenten und Kommissarien.
§ 223. Beendigung und Suspension der diplomatischen Functionen.
§§ 224-226. Wirkungen der Suspension oder Beendigung diplomatischer Sendungen. 
Elements, Wheaton.
Zweite Abtheilung. Die diplomatische Kunft. (§§ 227-233)
Dritte Abtheilung. Die Form der Staatenverhandlungen. § 234.
§ 235. Sprache der Verhandlungen überhaupt.
§ 236. Diplomatischer Stil.
§ 237. Korrespondenz der Souveräne selbst.
§ 238. Specielle Arten diplomatischer Schriften.
§ 239. Diplomatische Verhandlungsweise.
§ 240. Congresse.

Dritter Abschnitt.
Besondere Anstalten für den Rechts- und socialen Verhkehr
der Staaten und Völker.

§§ 241-242. Die Consuln.
§§ 243-245. Rechtsverhältnisse der Konsuln.
§ 246. Cartels wegen der Sicherheits- und Justizpflege.
§ 247. Internationale Post-, Eisenbahn- und Telegraphen-Verbindungen, dergl. Vereibarungen für die Gesundheitspflege.
Digest, Wharton, I.
§ 248. Internationale Fürsorge für Gewerbe.
§ 249. Instalten für Handels-, Schifftfahrts. und sostigen Verkehr.

Vierter Abschnitt.
Gebrauch von Kundschften. L’Espionage.

§ 250. Ueberhaut.
§ 251. Militarische Rundschafter.
§ 252. politische Rundsschfter.

Alfabetischer Register.









Top.

Letture online di giuristi tedeschi: Homepage.

B. | ↔ Successivo.
August Wihelm
Le letture di giuristi per me stranieri ha una duplice finalità: di scienza giuridica e di esercizio linguistico. La lettura online del testo straniero avviene in questo blog dedicato alla cultura giuridica, mentre per l'aspetto linguistico con annessi esercizi si rinvia all’apposito blog linguistico. La selezione dei testi è dettata dalla loro disponibilità nel dominio pubblico e da piani specifici di studio che saranno di volta indicati in appositi commenti. I testi sono attinti per lo più dalla Biblioteca Gallica e da Internet Archive, ai quali si rinvia il collegamento per la lettura online completa e disponibile. Parziali e progressive trascrizioni nei blog linguistici hanno carattere di esercizio in lingua.

HOMEPAGE

1. August Wilhelm Heffter: Das Europäischer Völkerrecht der Gegenwart auf den bisherigen Grundlagen. 8ª ed. 1888.



Top.

Monday, January 22, 2018

Letture online di giuristi italiani: 7. Giandomenico Romagnosi (1761-1835): VI. Scienza delle costituzioni (1849).

B. H. Prec. ↔ Succ.
La Scienza, ed. 1849.
 VI.

La Scienza
delle
Costituzioni
per Giandomenico Romagnosi
Opera Postuma
Volume Unico
Torino
Presso i Fratelli Canfari
tipografi-editori
1849


La Scienza, ed. 1850.
• Hoc civitati maximum est salutis initium, super quo, quasi stabili fundamento, aedificare postea, quicquid civitati decorum et huic constitutioni congruum sit, facile quisque poterit. Sed, si fundamentum hoc debile ruinosumque fuerit, nulla civilis opera prospere deinde succedet. Plato de Legibus Dial. V.
• Questo è allora il principio più importante della salvezza dello stato, e su questo principio come su una solida base è possibile per chiunque edificare in seguito quell'ordinamento politico che si adatta ad una simile formazione dello stato: ma se questa base è marcia, non vi sarà in alcun stato azione politica successiva che sia praticabile. Platone, Le leggi, V.
• Questo Volume Unico esce in Firenze nell’anno 1850, “a spese degli editori”.
• Dalla Introduzione dell’Autore: «In tutti i paesi inciviliti dell”Europa si è sollevata una voce che implora costituzioni momarchiche adattate alla situazione dei diversi popoli. Alcuni principi illuminati sui loro veri interessi hanno già secondato questa voce, ed altri vi sembrano propensi. Che cosa dunque rimane a fare agli scrittori politici? Rimane io rispondo, a far tutto ciò che si conviene ad una materia della più alta importanza, della quale non furono mai sviluppate a dovere le condizioni, fissati i principii e distese le regole: e quand’anche l’Europa tutta, o qualunque altra parte della terra presentasse monarchie costituzionali già stabilite e rese venerabili dal tempo, ciò non ostante resterebbe ancora a pensare molto e a dir molto. Gli uomini ed i governi cominceranno sempre col fare, e finiranno col pensare e collo scrivere, per far di nuovo meglio di quello che prima fecero».

Vol. II, Livorno e Napoli.
• Della Scienza delle costituzioni si trovano nell’Archivio Internet diverse edizioni: del 1849; del 1850; Tra due eguali scegliamo la più nitida e leggibile, ma fra due diverse le indichiamo entrambi. L’opera appare postuma e in varie edizioni, come volume unico o in più volumi. Questo è il Volume secondo uscito nel 1849 con questa dicitura nel frontespizio: «Si vende in Livorno nella Tipografia del Patriota. In Napoli dai principali librai» Questa edizione è stata stampata dalla Tipografia Perrotti.
• Segue dall’Introduzione dell’Autore: «Ardua posizione dell’uomo politico che progetta una costituzione specialmente monarchica! Egli deve collocarsi nel posto, dirò così, di un Dio per attribuire a’ principi ed a’ popoli ciò che è necessario alla loro guarentigia. Di qua la dignità del principe rigetta con isdegno que’ vincoli che tessuti da una esagerata diffidenza umiliano la di lui gloria ed inceppano senza necessità la prerogativa reale: di là poi la generosità nazionale rifugge con orrore dall’arbitrio lasciato agli errori ed alle passioni dei gabinetti e degli amministratori subalterni. Fra questi estremi chi può lusingarsi di camminare senza incontrare gli urti delle passioni e dei pregiudizi? Disse un antico: La verità è la più forte delle cose. Ma chi può avanti tempo assicurarsi di avere scoperta la verità, e di averla scoperta tutta? E quand’anche potesse nutrire questa lusinga, non sarebbe egli attorniato dai più terribili nemici? Io non conosco abbastanza lo stato interno delle estere nazioni; ma rispetto alla mia dirò, che da una parte tutta la bile feudale e clericale esaltata, e dall’altra tutto il senso grossolano ed incerto degli stessi amici dell’ordine alzano contra di me una opposizione tale, per cui io non posso confidare che nell‘azione lenta del tempo, e nella provvidenza d’un genio forte, generoso dei illuminato che regga i nostri destini».

Vol. I, Livorno e Napoli.
Nell’Archivio Internet si trova anche il primo volume dell’Edizione indicata, della Tipografia Perrotta, del 1849.
• Segue dall’Introduzione dell’Autore: «In aspettazione dunque degli eventi, altro non mi rimane che pagare alla mia patria quel tributo ch’io le debba, quello cioè de’ miei pensieri, dettato dallo zelo il più imparziale. Pur troppo io preveggo che niuno rimarrà contento di me. I cortigiani si sdegneranno e mi minacceranno, perché io abbia ardito di legare in modo nuovo le mani al monarca: i popolari si lagneranno di me, perché io abbia attribuito al re tutta l£autorità, e no mi sia riserbato che di cautelarne l’esercizio entro i limiti della più rigorosa neseccità. Da chi pertanto potrò sperare suffragio? Da que’ pochi saggi più amati dal Cielo ai quali alla fine è raccomdandato il destino delle utili verità. Essi rimarranno facilmente convinti, che una buona costituzione è il miglior regalo che fare si possa al monarca ed al popolo: al monarca per la sua potenza e per la sua gloria: al popolo per la sua sicurezza e per la sua prosperità».

Indice Sommario
della
(Volume Unico, 1850)

Pagina
5: Introduzione.
13: Parte Prima. Teoria Generale.
15: Capitolo Primo. Intento e necessità di una costituzione monarchica.
§ 1: Fine universale di qualunque istituzione di Governo.
§ 2: Fine particolare delle costituzioni monarchiche.
§ 3: Del temperamento dei poteri.
§ 4: Motivi speciali che rendono necessario il temperamento dei poteri del governo monarchico.
§ 5: (Continuazione) Necessità perpetua di garantirsi dal dispotismo minisyteriale.
21: Capitolo II. Come si possa ordinare una costituzione nazionale salva la prerogativa regia.
§ 6: Avvertenze preliminari.
§ 7: (Continuazione) Carattere essenziale d’una costituzione.
§ 8: Antagonismo e sua azione sull’autorità reale.
§ 9: Come definire la necessità di temperare l'autorità regia.
§ 10: Limiti dell’antagonismo.


Top.

Letture online di giuristi italiani: 6. Giandomenico Romagnosi (1761-1835): V. Dell’incivilimento italiano in relazione alla giurisprudenza (1839).

B. H. Prec. ↔ Succ.
Incivilimento italiano.
V.

  GIAN DOMENICO ROMAGNOSI

discorso di
Gian Domenico Romagnosi,
stampato presso gli
Editori degli annali Universali
 delle Scienze e dell’Industria,
 in Milano 1839.

Letture online di giuristi italiani: Homepage.

GIURISTI ITALIANI
online
Lettura di Opere

1. 
Pasquale Stanislao Mancini (1817-1888):

2. 
Gian Domenico Romagnosi (1761-1835):
i.
Introduzione.

3. 
Gian Domenico Romagnosi:
ii.
Opere, vol. II, pt 1ª (1844).

4. 
Gian Domenico Romagnosi:
iii.
Saggio di Politica (1858).

5. 
Gian Domenico Romagnosi:
iv.

6. 
Gian Domenico Romagnosi:
 v.
Dell’incivilimento italiano in relazione alla giurisprudenza (1839)

7. Gian Domenico Romagnosi:
8. Gian Domenico Romagnosi:
9. Gian Domenico Romagnosi:

Letture online di giuristi italiani: 5. Giandomenico Romagnosi (1761-1835): IV. La Genesi del Diritto Penale.

B. H. Prec. ↔ Succ.
Diritto Penale.
 IV.

GIAN DOMENICO ROMAGNOSI
La Genesi del diritto penale,
 quarta edizione pratese, edita in Prato, dalla Tipografia Guasti, nel 1842. 

AVVISO
dell’Editore

Parrebbe offendere al tempo stesso e il merito sommo dell’Autore della Genesi del Diritto Penale, e quei tanti versatissimi nella Giurisprudenza, i quali hanno accolto con grande soddisfazione, ed accolgono dopo tante successive edizioni, questa egregia opera, il voler prendere ad esaltarla e dimostrarne il valore. E che resterebbe a dirne dopo l’elogio fattone dal Prof. Baldassarre Poli il quale afferma che in questo lavoro «l’ordine non può idearsi il migliore. o si riguardi il complesso e la successione delle materie, oppure il loro riparto e la loro distribuzione in relazione del tutto, che è il soggetto dell’opera». (segue lettura online).














xxxx

Letture online di giuristi italiani: 4. Giandomenico Romagnosi (1761-1835): III. Saggio di Politica.

B. Home. Prec. ↔  Succ.
Saggio di Politica.
 2) Un Saggio di Politica, attribuito a Gian Domenico Romagnosi, edito a Firenze da Felice Le Monnier, nel 1858. Inizia con una storia del manoscritto e di come si giunse della sua attribuzione al Romagnosi. L’editore Le Monnier scrive di aver ricevuto cinque anni prima il manoscritto dal signor Marco Bognolo che gli assicurava esser l’opera del Romagnosi, e che così scriveva in data 15 agosto 1855: «Egregio Signor Le Monnier, divenuto io eventualmente, parecchi anni or sono, possessore del manoscritto d’una eccellente Opera postuma del nostro grande Romagnosi, e parendomi un grave errore e quasi una specie di sacrilegio il tenerlo sepolto nella privata mia libreria, anziché fare in modo che potesse venir pubblicato, onde non frustrare l’Italia del possedimento dun sì prezioso gioiello, mi feci carico di proporne a lei la pubblicazione; ed avendo ella annuito ad incaricarsene purché io fossi in grado di comprovarle esser esso effettivamente lavoro dell3illustre pubblicista, e ne assumessi positivamente la responsabilità presso il pubblico; ecco quanto, nell’incoccussa certezza in cui verso sopra tal punto importante, mi fo premura di dichiararle colla presente, cui devengo ben volentieri ad autorizzarla a pubblicare senza eccezione di sorta, quasi proemio o prefazione dell’opera in discorso, a piena e formale di lei guarentigia nell’argomento... etc.», che può leggersi online. xxxx

Letture online di giuristi italiani: 3. Giandomenico Romagnosi (1761-1835): II. Opere, ed. de Giorgi, Vol. II° parte 1ª

B. S. H. Prec. ↔ Succ.
Opere Vol. II P. I -
1) OPERE di G. D. Romagnosi, riordinate ed illustrate da Alessandro de Giorgi, dottore in filosofia e leggi, con annotazioni, la vita dell'autore, l'indice delle definizioni e dottrine comprese nelle opere, ed un saggio critico e analitico su le leggi naturali dell'ordine morale per servire d'introduzione ed analisi delle medesime. Volume II, Parte prima. SCRITTI STORICO-FILOSOFICI E LETTERARI, Milano, Presso Perelli e Mariani Editori, co' i Tipi di Angelo Rocca in Padova, 1844.

AI LETTORI

Il titolo di Scritti storico-filosofici e letterari a bastanza fa conoscere quali Opere io abbia voluto accogliere in questo Volume, che ho ripartito il tre Sezioni. Nella prima sono li Scritti editi ed inediti su l’incivilimento; nella seconda li Opuscoli storico-filosofici editi ed inediti, li Opuscoli letterar; e le Biografie; nella terza le Ricerche storiche su l’India antica di Robertson, con Note e Supplementi del nostro Autore, cui precedono tre brevi Articoli di Giuseppe Sacchi, tolti dagli Annali Universali di Statistica, nei quali dà conto di questo lavoro del nostro Autore, mettendo in bella luce le dottrine da Romagnosi propugnate.

Top.

Saturday, January 20, 2018

Letture online di giuristi italiani: 1.2 Giandomenico Romagnosi (1761-1835): I. Introduzione. Sommario.

B. O. H. Precedente. ↔  Successivo.
Internet Archive: Elenco.
I.

  Introduzione

Gian Domenico Romagnosi: di lui si trovano articoli enciclopedici e divulgativi in:
a) Wikipedia-it; Gian Domenico Romagnosi (Salsomaggiore Terme, 11 dicembre 1761 – Milano, 8 giugno 1835) è stato un giurista, filosofo ed economista italiano. Si laurea in Giurisprudenza a Parma nel 1786. Dal 1794 al 1798 è consulente legale; a Trento è autore di due volumetti dal titolo rispettivamente di "Cosa è eguaglianza" e "Cosa è la libertà?" in cui si schierò contro i principi della rivoluzione francese. Nel 1804 insegna diritto pubblico nell'Università di Parma, nel 1806 è chiamato a Milano a occuparsi della revisione del codice di procedura penale; nel 1807 ottiene la cattedra di diritto civile all'Università di Pavia e pubblica il discorso Quale sia il governo più adatto a perfezionare la legislazione civili; nel 1809 è professore nella Scuola di Alta legislazione e ispettore delle scuole di diritto e, nel 1811, fonda il Giornale di giurisprudenza universale.

b) Treccani; Di formazione illuministica, R. fu un fautore dell'unità italiana, idea che gli costò varie traversie (tra cui, a partire dal 1821, il divieto di insegnare). Come giurista è considerato uno dei fondatori del diritto penale moderno (Genesi del diritto penale, 1791). Come filosofo fu un convinto assertore della 'filosofia civile', ossia di una riflessione che studia l'uomo nella sua concreta evoluzione storico-sociale, unendo la dimensione morale a quella giuridico-politica ed economica. A tale impostazione si rifece il suo allievo C. Cattaneo.

 c) nel sito Filosofico-net; d) nel sito Scienzainrete. -

Nell’Internet Archive, ad oggi, si trovano diverse opere, di Romagnosi o su Romagnosi, comodamente leggibili online:
Opere.

i. Opere, vol. II. - ii. Saggio di Politica. - iii. La Genesi del Diritto Penale. - iv. Saggio di Politica. - v. Dell’incivilimento italiano in relazione alla giurispudenza. - vi. Scienza delle Costituzioni. -




Top.

Letture online di giuristi italiani: 1. Pasquale Stanislao Mancini: Diritto Internazionale, Roma 1905.

B. Home. ↔ Successivo.
Internet Archive.
1.

P. Stanislao Mancini
Augusto Piearantoni

Diritto Internazionale

Roma
Unione Tipografica Manuzio
Via di Porta Salaria, 23a

1905


Top.